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Gender and the Environment Library Display

Poster that mirrors the game Operations’s front cover with a satirical tone and critique of how womxn of color are neglected proper health care.  See the heading Description for a full description.

Creator

Jehieli Luevanos

Object

Poster that mirrors the game Operations’s front cover with a satirical tone and critique of how womxn of color are neglected proper health care.

Description

This poster brings attention to the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Womxn epidemic and the disproportionate violence experienced by Indigenous women.

This poster brings attention to the different medical treatment women and people of color experience. I used the Operation game’s front cover as a reference in order to draw attention and then use the bright colors and cartoon aspect to contrast the severity of racial biases in medicine. I specifically chose the women to be darker skinned to show representation. At the bottom of my poster on top of the word “operation” I put the quote “A Black female, they didn’t teach this is medical school” to reference how the majority of medical studies and knowledge is based on white men. As we have learned women and people of color show different symptoms when in different medical scenarios, such as heart attacks At the top of the poster I quote Dr. Keisha Ray on how black women are more likely to die after giving birth than white women despite levels of education. I chose this quote in particular to show regardless of education or socio-economic status, pre convived notions and a lack of gendered studies leave black women vulnerable to higher rates of death in hospitals.

Medicine is supposed to be the great equalizer, yet brown and black Americans, particularly women, have higher rates of death in hospitals then their white counterparts, simply because of the color of their skin.